QUEER SCIENCE FICTIONS

Current issue

VOL 4, NO 1 (2018)
Incited by recent conversations and controversies concerning queers and queerness in popular science fiction, this issue, with special guest editor Nike Sulway (Rupetta, 2013), offers a range of perspectives on queer science fictions. 
The articles, interview, and reviews in this issue seek to make visible the invisible queer pasts, presents, and futures of science fiction, and to cultivate science fictional possibilities for future actual and imagined queer bodies, lives, relationships, communities.
Editorial
Articles
March 7, 2019 in Science Fiction

Queer, Difference, Heresy

Daniel Hourigan looks closely at some of the fantasy coordinates of NA Sulway's Rupetta
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March 6, 2019 in Science Fiction

The Queer Body as Time Machine

Tara East focuses on how time travel narratives challenge gender norms through experimental representations of bodies and sexuality
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March 5, 2019 in Science Fiction

A Constellation of Intimacies

Ed Chamberlain examines the representation of human desire, feeling and migration in Michael Cunningham's Specimen Days
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March 4, 2019 in Science Fiction

‘His Unspoken Natural Center’

Nike Sulway examines the ways James Tiptree, Jr's identity disrupts the gender-normalising structure of authorial constructions and expectations
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March 3, 2019 in Science Fiction

Sad Puppies and Happy Queers

Holly Voigt reviews NK Jemisin's Broken Earth trilogy
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March 2, 2019 in Science Fiction

Of Diversity and Fairy Dust

Kelly Gardiner reviews Kaleidoscope: Diverse YA Science Fiction and Fantasy Stories (edited by Alisa Krasnostein and Julia Rios)
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March 1, 2019 in Science Fiction

‘Passing Strange’: in conversation with Ellen Klages

Kelly Gardiner reviews Kaleidoscope: Diverse YA Science Fiction and Fantasy Stories (edited by Alisa Krasnostein and Julia Rios)
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“Those damn women are ruining science fiction."

— Read the editorial

Simon Biggs
‘Manifolds’ is a fully immersive, physically interactive, three-dimensional digital projection environment. The artwork explores how interactors (performers or viewers) may experience a shift in their sense of physical presence in the space through interaction with an adaptive torsional visual agent. The work allows the interactors to gain a sense of their presence in the environment through visual feedback of haptic torque, allowing a sense of extension of their bodies to emerge – between the individual and collective interactors and the visual agent.
 
See more work by Simon Biggs here: http://www.littlepig.org.uk/​